Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Pic Today 7/31/12






PERFECT PEACHES & PLUMS

It's that time of the year . . .

when Goldbud Farms (Placerville, CA)
ships their flawless, organic stone-fruit
to select markets and customers
in North America.

These famous mountain orchards
are just now shipping their perfectly-ripe
giant peaches and plums,
which have just arrived in St. Louis.

Always receiving critical acclaim,
Goldbud peaches and plums are
indescribably juicy and delicious.

(www.goldbudfarms.com)

Yum!

Monday, July 30, 2012

Pic Today 7/30/12



RAIN, FINALLY

I leave drought stricken St. Louis Friday,
when it's 106˚.

I come home Sunday to blessed rain,
and it's 72˚.

A nice sustained 4-hour rain,
and 34˚ cooler.
(That's what I call a homecoming gift!)

More, please.





Saturday, July 28, 2012

Friday, July 27, 2012

Pic Today 7/27/12



RAIN HOPES DASHED

It was exciting, these past few days.

After these weeks and months of drought,
the possibility of rain in the forecast.

Dark clouds formed and rolled in.
We hoped and prayed.
It's all we could do to contain ourselves.

The cool breezes came through,
as we stared at the sky
and waited.

Nary a drop.
Our rain hopes dashed.

(Friday back in the 100's.)

No more posts on our tragic dry weather.
It depresses us all.

Maybe if we don't talk about it . . .


Thursday, July 26, 2012

Pic Today 7/26/12







THE NOT-SO-MIGHTY
M I S S I S S I P P I

Rivers throughout Missouri are
at historic low levels
due to the sustained drought,
but none are affecting the area (and nation)
as dramatically as the Mississippi River.

Fact is, most of the nation's commodity freight
(e.g. corn, wheat, coal, mined ore, etc.)
travels by barge . . . and 90% of the nation's barges
travel on the mighty Mississip!

But with no rain, river levels are low . . .
too low to float a full barge.
Barge lines must reduce their loads
or run the risk of getting stuck.
That increases freight costs and delays shipments.

The Mississippi River at St. Louis
is 13-feet below normal
(55-feet lower than last year's floods.)

That's a lot of water we don't have.
A lot of rain we do need.


Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Pic Today 7/25/12







ONE FLOWER
THAT THRIVES IN THIS HEAT

The prickly pear cactus (opuntia)
stands tall in local gardens,
and brings flowers forward
despite the drought.

Its ripe fruit (the pears) are delicious
in jams and desserts.
Its paddles (nopales) are harvested
and a popular ingredient in Mexican dishes.

The paddles are cleaned, carefully, and
scraped of their sharp needles,
then boiled in salt water for 10 minutes
before being chopped and sautéed
as a delicious ingredient in scrambled eggs,
salsa, tacos and baked potatoes.

Finally . . .
a beautiful and delicious garden crop
for our record heat and drought spell.
(Today it was 108˚ in St. Louis.)



Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Pic Today 7/24/12




WHEN YOUR CAR
STARTS STEAMIN'

pull over!


WHEN YOUR CAR
STARTS SMOKIN'

get out!


WHEN YOUR CAR
STARTS FLAMIN'

run baby run!


(106˚ today in St. Louis)



Monday, July 23, 2012

Pic Today 7/23/12







THE FACES OF PLAY

"Play gives children
a chance to practice
what they're learning."

-- Fred Rogers (Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood)


Sunday, July 22, 2012

Pic Today 7/22/12



















ROGUE UNDERGROUND DINING
AMIDST A FORTUNE IN CLASSIC CARS

Rogue Underground Dining Society
celebrated its 21st gourmet dining event
surrounded by a million dollar vintage car collection.

A collector of rare classic cars
opened his showroom for Rogue Underground diners
for a special multi-course gourmet dinner.
Diners sat alongside vintage cars from yesteryear
while they enjoyed an 8-course meal
prepared by Rogue chefs and their staff.

Craftsmanship from auto makers and chefs
was appreciated by lucky attendees.




Saturday, July 21, 2012

Pic Today 7/21/12














HISTORIC MOUNDS
ARE REMNANTS OF THE
GREATEST AMERICAN INDIAN SITE

Just east of St. Louis, in Cahokia Illinois
are the Cahohia Mounds,
the largest prehistoric Indian site north of Mexico.

From 800-1000, the Mississippian culture began
as highly structured communities,
supporting populations of 20,000 people in a
complex permanent community.
Virtually the center of American Indian populations,
trade routes reached across the continent
with Cahokia at its center.

Agricultural fields surrounded the central complex
of enormous earthen mounds,
made of earth dug from pits with stone and wood tools,
and transported in baskets on people's backs.
It is estimated that over 50-million cubic feet of earth
was moved for mounds which still stand today.

By the late 1300's, Cahokia was abandoned.
Where the Cahokians went or what tribes they became
remain unanswered questions.

(Perhaps they had a drought!)